2016 Nebula Award for Best Novel

The Nebulas honour the best in science fiction and fantasy in a number of categories every year.  This year the honour of Best Novel went to Charlie Jane Anders.

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane AndersA novel about the end of the world–and the beginning of our future.
Childhood friends Patricia Delfine and Laurence Armstead didn’t expect to see each other again, after parting ways under mysterious circumstances during high school. After all, the development of magical powers and the invention of a two-second time machine could hardly fail to alarm one’s peers and families.
But now they’re both adults, living in the hipster mecca San Francisco, and the planet is falling apart around them. Laurence is an engineering genius who’s working with a group that aims to avert catastrophic breakdown through technological intervention into the changing global climate. Patricia is a graduate of Eltisley Maze, the hidden academy for the world’s magically gifted, and works with a small band of other magicians to secretly repair the world’s ever-growing ailments. Little do they realize that something bigger than either of them, something begun years ago in their youth, is determined to bring them together–to either save the world, or plunge it into a new dark ages.
A deeply magical, darkly funny examination of life, love, and the apocalypse.” (GoodReads)

You can see the rest of this year’s Nebula winners here.

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2013 Nebula Award for Best Novel Winner

Here is the winner of the SFWA’s 2013 Nebula Award for best Novel:

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie

Ancillary Justice (Imperial Radch, #1)

On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest.  Breq is both more than she seems and less than she was. Years ago, she was the Justice of Toren–a colossal starship with an artificial intelligence linking thousands of corpse soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy.   An act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with only one fragile human body. And only one purpose–to revenge herself on Anaander Mianaai, many-bodied, near-immortal Lord of the Radch.

From debut author Ann Leckie, Ancillary Justice is a stunning space opera that asks what it means to be human in a universe guided by artificial intelligence.

read more on GoodReads

2013 Nebula Awards Winners Announced

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2012 Nebula Award Winner

This year’s Nebula Award for Novel went to: 2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson

11830394The year is 2312. Scientific and technological advances have opened gateways to an extraordinary future. Earth is no longer humanity’s only home; new habitats have been created throughout the solar system on moons, planets, and in between. But in this year, 2312, a sequence of events will force humanity to confront its past, its present, and its future.

The first event takes place on Mercury, on the city of Terminator, itself a miracle of engineering on an unprecedented scale. It is an unexpected death, but one that might have been foreseen. For Swan Er Hong, it is an event that will change her life. Swan was once a woman who designed worlds. Now she will be led into a plot to destroy them. (view on Goodreads)

 

http://www.sfwa.org/2013/05/2012-nebula-award-winners-announced/

 

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2010 Nebula Award Winner

The 2010 Nebula Awards were announced at the Nebula Awards Banquet held at the Hilton Cocoa Beach Ocean front on 15 May 2010.

The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi

The Guardian had this to say of Bacigalupi’s novel:

“Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl was voted winner of the Nebula by the 1,500 author members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, ahead of novels including China Miéville’s fantastical crime novel The City and the City, which won prestigious UK science fiction prize the Arthur C Clarke late last month, Jeff VanderMeer’s Finch and Cherie Priest’s Boneshaker.

Nominated for a Hugo award and named one of the 10 best novels of last year by Time magazine, The Windup Girl is the story of Emiko, an engineered being grown in a creche to satisfy the sexual whims of a Japanese businessman and abandoned to roam the streets of Bangkok. Set in a world where the global economy is built on calories, Emiko meets Anderson Lake, who is searching Bangkok for “extinct” foodstuffs for his company AgriGen.”

For more category winners follow the link: http://www.nebulaawards.com/index.php/guest_blogs/sfwa_announces_2010_nebula_awards_winners/

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