TBR Chronicles #08

This month Margaret Atwood’s new book, The Heart Goes Last, was published.  I really enjoyed The Handmaid’s Tale and have a lot of her other books on my The Heart Goes LastTBR so it just makes sense that her latest offering goes on the list.

Another new release coming next month is David Mitchell’s Slade HouseSlade House is the novel which follows the highly The Bone Clocksacclaimed The Bone Clocks which I have also earmarked for reading.  I have quite a few David Mitchell books on my TBR too so these two new releases were not only exciting but also a kick in the rear to get said rear into gear and get through some of these great books.

This month I added a John Steinbeck book to my TBR.  The truth is that Slade Housedespite being aware of his books’ status as classics of literature I have never really found myself all that interested.  Probably because Grapes of Wrath is the one everyone raves about and it doesn’t seem to pique my interest.  East of Eden, however, I am now very interested in because Steinbeck is said to have spoken of East of Eden with pride:East of Eden

“It has everything in it I have been able to learn about my craft or profession in all these years.” He further claimed, “I think everything else I have written has been, in a sense, practice for this.” (Read the article)

The final addition to my TBR list this month comes from Italo Calvino but not in the form of his fiction.  Why Read the Classics?Calvino’s Why Read The Classics came to my attention as I have been working on creating my own list of novels to include in Lilolia’s Friday Book Feature post series which used to follow some popular book lists.  I read an article on Brain Pickings with excerpts from this book about how to classify classics and there were some points I agreed with and so I was convinced to read this book.

 

Have you read any of these?  I’d love to hear what you thought.

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Joe Hill’s Favourite Horror Villains

Joe Hill, author of NOS4A2, lists his favourite horror villains.  We love a good bad guy so I thought I’d share this list with you but first here’s a bit more about Hill’s novel:

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

NOS4A2

“Victoria McQueen has a secret gift for finding things: a misplaced bracelet, a missing photograph, answers to unanswerable questions. On her Raleigh Tuff Burner bike, she makes her way to a rickety covered bridge that, within moments, takes her wherever she needs to go, whether it’s across Massachusetts or across the country.  Charles Talent Manx has a way with children. He likes to take them for rides in his 1938 Rolls-Royce Wraith with the NOS4A2 vanity plate. With his old car, he can slip right out of the everyday world, and onto the hidden roads that transport them to an astonishing – and terrifying – playground of amusements he calls “Christmasland.”  Then, one day, Vic goes looking for trouble—and finds Manx. That was a lifetime ago. Now Vic, the only kid to ever escape Manx’s unmitigated evil, is all grown up and desperate to forget. But Charlie Manx never stopped thinking about Victoria McQueen. He’s on the road again and he’s picked up a new passenger: Vic’s own son.” (read more on GoodReads)

Mr. Dark

from Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Something Wicked This Way Comes

“A masterpiece of modern Gothic literature, Something Wicked This Way Comes is the memorable story of two boys, James Nightshade and William Halloway, and the evil that grips their small Midwestern town with the arrival of a “dark carnival” one Autumn midnight. How these two innocents, both age 13, save the souls of the town (as well as their own), makes for compelling reading on timeless themes. What would you do if your secret wishes could be granted by the mysterious ringmaster Mr. Dark? Bradbury excels in revealing the dark side that exists in us all, teaching us ultimately to celebrate the shadows rather than fear them. In many ways, this is a companion piece to his joyful, nostalgia-drenched Dandelion Wine, in which Bradbury presented us with one perfect summer as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old. In Something Wicked This Way Comes, he deftly explores the fearsome delights of one perfectly terrifying, unforgettable autumn.” (read more on GoodReads)

Anton Chigur

from No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy

No Country for Old Men

“In his blistering new novel, Cormac McCarthy returns to the Texas-Mexico border, setting of his famed Border Trilogy. The time is our own, when rustlers have given way to drug-runners and small towns have become free-fire zones.  One day, a good old boy named Llewellyn Moss finds a pickup truck surrounded by a bodyguard of dead men. A load of heroin and two million dollars in cash are still in the back. When Moss takes the money, he sets off a chain reaction of catastrophic violence that not even the law–in the person of aging, disillusioned Sheriff Bell–can contain. As Moss tries to evade his pursuers–in particular a mysterious mastermind who flips coins for human lives–McCarthy simultaneously strips down the American crime novel and broadens its concerns to encompass themes as ancient as the Bible and as bloodily contemporary as this morning’s headlines.” (read more on GoodReads)

Abbot Enomoto

from The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet

“In 1799, Jacob de Zoet disembarks on the tiny island of Dejima, the Dutch East India Company’s remotest trading post in a Japan otherwise closed to the outside world. A junior clerk, his task is to uncover evidence of the previous Chief Resident’s corruption.  Cold-shouldered by his compatriots, Jacob earns the trust of a local interpreter and, more dangerously, becomes intrigued by a rare woman—a midwife permitted to study on Dejima under the company physician. He cannot foresee how disastrously each will be betrayed by someone they trust, nor how intertwined and far-reaching the consequences.  Duplicity and integrity, love and lust, guilt and faith, cold murder and strange immortality stalk the stage in this enthralling novel, which brings to vivid life the ordinary—and extraordinary—people caught up in a tectonic shift between East and West.” (read more on GoodReads)

Amy Dunne

from Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl

“On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media–as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents–the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter–but is he really a killer?  As the cops close in, every couple in town is soon wondering how well they know the one that they love. With his twin sister, Margo, at his side, Nick stands by his innocence. Trouble is, if Nick didn’t do it, where is that beautiful wife? And what was in that silvery gift box hidden in the back of her bedroom closet?” (read more on GoodReads)

Ursula Monkton

from The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

“Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy. Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.” (read more on GoodReads)

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2010 Man Booker Dozen Longlist

On 27 July the 2010 Man Booker Prize judges released the dozen longlist.  The shortlist is set to be released on 7 September and the winner will be announced on 12 October at a dinner at London’s Guildhall.  The 2010 longlist for this prestigious prize includes a diverse selection of literary work some of whose authors are definitely no strangers to this prize.  Here is a quote from the chair of judges which explains their feelings toward their selection.

The chair of judges, Andrew Motion, comments: “Here are thirteen exceptional novels – books we have chosen for their intrinsic quality, without reference to the past work of their authors. Wide-ranging in their geography and their concern, they tell powerful stories which make the familiar strange and cover an enormous range of history and feeling. We feel confident that they will provoke and entertain.”

From 138 books the following have been longlisted for the 2010 Man Booker Prize for Fiction:

Peter Carey for Parrot and Olivier in America

Emma Donoghue for Room

Helen Dunmore for The Betrayal

Damon Galgut for In a Strange Room

Howard Jacobson for The Finkler Question

Andrea Levy for The Long Song

Tom McCarthy for C

David Mitchell for The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet 

Lisa Moore for February

Paul Murray for Skippy Dies

Rose Tremain for Trespass

Christos Tsiolkas for The Slap

Alan Warner for The Stars in the Bright Sky

 

http://www.themanbookerprize.com/news/stories/1427

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