E.L. Doctorow’s Favorite Books About Memory

E L Doctorow is a super award winning novelist who released his latest novel, Andrew’s Brain, this year.  I am definitely going to get my hands on Andrew’s Brain which looks really good, and I thought I’d share Doctorow’s favourite books about memory as I’m quite intrigued by the topic.  First here’s a look at Doctorow’s new novel:

Andrew’s Brain by E L Doctorow

Andrew's Brain

This brilliant new novel by an American master, the author of Ragtime, The Book of Daniel, Billy Bathgate, and The March, takes us on a radical trip into the mind of a man who, more than once in his life, has been an inadvertent agent of disaster.  Speaking from an unknown place and to an unknown interlocutor, Andrew is thinking, Andrew is talking, Andrew is telling the story of his life, his loves, and the tragedies that have led him to this place and point in time. And as he confesses, peeling back the layers of his strange story, we are led to question what we know about truth and memory, brain and mind, personality and fate, about one another and ourselves. (read more on GoodReads)

A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

A Moveable Feast

“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” – ERNEST HEMINGWAY, to a friend, 1950.  Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway’s most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized. (read more on GoodReads)

Speak, Memory by Vladimir Nabokov

Speak, Memory (Everyman Library)

‘Speak, memory’ said Vladimir Nabokov. And immediately there came flooding back to him a host of enchanting recollections – of his comfortable childhood and adolescence, of his rich, liberal-minded father, his beautiful mother, an army of relations and family hangers-on and of grand old houses in St Petersburg and the surrounding countryside in pre-revolutionary Russia. Young love, butterflies, tutors and a multitude of other themes thread together to weave an autobiography which is itself a work of art. (read more on GoodReads)

The Emigrants by W G Sebald

The Emigrants

At first The Emigrants appears simply to document the lives of four Jewish émigrés in the twentieth century. But gradually, as Sebald’s precise, almost dreamlike prose begins to draw their stories, the four narrations merge into one overwhelming evocation of exile and loss.  Written with a bone-dry sense of humour and a fascination with the oddness of existence The Emigrants is highly original in its heady mix of fact, memory and fiction and photographs.  (read more on GoodReads)

Patrimony by Philip Roth

Patrimony

Patrimony, a true story, touches the emotions as strongly as anything Philip Roth has ever written. Roth watches as his eighty-six-year-old father, famous for his vigor, charm, and his repertoire of Newark recollections, battles with the brain tumor that will kill him. The son, full of love, anxiety, and dread, accompanies his father through each fearful stage of his final ordeal, and, as he does so, discloses the survivalist tenacity that has distinguished his father’s long, stubborn engagement with life. (read more on GoodReads)

The Mind of a Mnemonist by Alexander R. Luria

The Mind Of The Mnemonist: A Little Book About A Vast Memory

The Mind of a Mnemonist is a rare phenomenon – a scientific study that transcends its data and, in the manner of the best fictional literature, fashions a portrait of an unforgettable human being.  (read more on GoodReads)

 

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Verity M

WRITER #Reading #Photography #Creativity #LifeDesign blogging on Lilolia. Van Gogh: "It is good to love many things, for therein lies strength..."

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